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The most recent news stories involving children and young people

CEOP

Sats for seven-year-olds set to be scrapped (30/03/2017)

Controversial national tests taken by seven-year-olds in England could be scrapped under new government plans. The move follows years of pressure from teachers, parents and educationalists opposed to putting young pupils through high stakes national Sats tests. The statutory tests in English, maths and spelling and grammar, are used to monitor schools' progress. The Department for Education is proposing a new assessment for pupils when they first start school instead.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

Is your child watching fake cartoons? (27/03/2017)

Trending found a number of YouTube channels have fake versions of popular cartoons, often with scenes unsuitable for young children.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

Childhood obesity: Cut unhealthy food multi-buy offers - MPs (27/03/2017)

The government must do more to reduce the number of cut-price and multi-buy offers on unhealthy food to help curb childhood obesity, a group of MPs say. The report, by the Health Select Committee, also calls for rules on junk food advertisements to be made tougher. It argues the government's official obesity plan contains "vague statements" that are "inadequate". But ministers say the strategy is the world's "most ambitious plan on childhood obesity".

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Charity highlights impact of repeated moves for children living in poverty (27/03/2017)

The stress and uncertainty of repeatedly packing up their lives and moving home is becoming a "worryingly normal" part of life for some children growing up in poverty, a charity has warned. A three-year study by The Children's Society found that moving house multiple times was a key issue for children, with one nine-year-old having moved home at least eight times and attended four schools.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Schools under fire for putting rape victims in classroom with alleged attackers (27/03/2017)

Schools are being urged to take more care over how they treat pupils who have been sexually abused by their classmates. Tes can reveal that in many cases staff have failed rape victims by putting them back into classrooms with their alleged attackers. MPs and charities have warned that schools are struggling to respond to ‘peer on peer’ sexual abuse because there is a “gap” in the government’s safeguarding guidance.

Full story: TES

Guardian

Mental health problems rife among teenagers but teachers lack skills to help (26/03/2017)

The vast majority of teenagers say they experience “emotional distress” after starting secondary school but claim teachers don’t have the skills to help them, research has found. Four in every five 12- to 16-year-olds in the survey said they felt they had mental health problems but just one in 20 would turn to a teacher for help if they felt depressed, anxious, stressed or emotionally unable to cope. The poll of 500 secondary school pupils, for the teenage mental health charity stem4, comes as MPs were warned that schools had only a “patchy” ability to pick up and prevent mental health problems in pupils.

Full story: Guardian

CYP Now

Behaviour tsar calls for 'internal inclusion units' in schools (24/03/2017)

Government should fund schools to create internal inclusion units to offer targeted early specialist intervention for children with behavioural problems, a government adviser has said. A report by Tom Bennett, who was appointed in 2015 to advise the government on behaviour in schools said the primary aim of the units should be to aid the reintegration of students back into the mainstream school community.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Guardian

Behaviour is a national problem in schools in England, review finds (24/03/2017)

Schools have a national behaviour problem and there are “perverse incentives” for headteachers to paint their school in the best light, according to the government’s behaviour tsar. Poor conduct remains a significant issue for many schools in England, and there needs to be better ways available to help tackle the problem, Tom Bennett, who advises the government on behaviour issues, said in a report. In his review, Bennett also suggested there was a striking contrast between data gathered by Ofsted and school leaders on behaviour, and the experiences of classroom teachers.

Full story: Guardian

Independent

Child sex offences recorded across UK hits all-time high amid growing concerns over online grooming (23/03/2017)

Child sex offences recorded by police forces across the UK have hit an all-time high, prompting campaigners to urge that more needs be done to reduce the “increasingly common” instances of children at risk of online grooming. The number of alleged sex offences against children in 2016 was up by nearly a fifth on the previous year, climbing to 55,507, or one child sex offence every ten minutes, according to figures obtained by the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC). A total of 13,565 incidents of rape, sexual assault and sexual exploitation were recorded against children aged ten and under, while 2,799 of these crimes were perpetrated against children below the age of four – some of whom would be too young to even attend primary school.

Full story: Independent

Sky News

Child sex offence recorded by police every 10 minutes, NSPCC says (23/03/2017)

A child sex offence is recorded by police every 10 minutes in the UK, according to the NSPCC. The charity says a record 55,507 suspected sexual crimes against under-18s were logged in 2015/16, which is almost a 20% increase on the previous 12 months. Campaigners are calling for more funding to be made available to train the police in catching online abusers, and helping the victims. The NSPCC used figures provided by the 43 police forces in England and Wales to estimate the current extent of the problem, with an average of 152 offences being reported on a daily basis.

Full story: Sky News

CEOP

Drop in teacher training recruits revealed (23/03/2017)

There are fears it could get even tougher to recruit teachers after a drop in the number of trainees on courses in England. The latest figures show a 7% drop in acceptances on to teacher training courses for this year. Head teachers' leaders said the drop in recruits would deepen the teacher recruitment crisis. The Department for Education said there were more teachers than ever before in England's schools.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

It's good to talk: pupils gather for world's largest mental health lesson (22/03/2017)

“Talking about mental health does not make you weak,” the world’s largest mental health lesson has been told. Til Wykes, a clinical psychologist, told an audience of more than 500 13-18-year-olds from around the country: “We want to get people to come to treatment early because if they come early, they recover faster and they recover better.” The event on Tuesday at Hackney Empire in east London, compered by the 4Music presenter Maya Jama, was designed to teach children and young people about what mental health is, how to protect it and deal with problems when they arise. Officially recognised as the Guinness World Record for the largest-ever mental health lesson, with 538 young people present, the hope is that it also raises general awareness about the issue among young people and helps combat the stigma surrounding it.

Full story: Guardian

CYP Now

DfE launches website ahead of tax-free childcare launch (22/03/2017)

The government's tax-free childcare scheme will officially get under way on 28 April, with parents able to pre-register through a new website dedicated to childcare entitlements, the Department for Education has announced. From next month parents of children under the age of two will be able to access the tax-free childcare scheme, whereby the government tops up £2 for every £8 parents pay into it. By the end of the year the scheme will be available to all eligible parents of children under the age of 12, or under 17 if disabled.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CEOP

Warning over segregation in England's schools (22/03/2017)

Thousands of state schools across England are segregated along ethnic or social grounds, according to research. More than a quarter of primary and four in 10 secondary schools are ethnically divided, the social integration charity, The Challenge, found. It says almost a third of primary and a quarter of secondary schools are segregated along socio-economic lines. The Department for Education says all schools are expected to promote social integration and British values.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

Quarter of English state primary schools are 'ethnically segregated' (22/03/2017)

The government is being urged to tackle segregation in schools after research claimed that more than a quarter of all state primary schools across England and four in 10 state secondaries were ethnically segregated. The study, which uses a new measure of segregation, also claims that 30% of primary schools and 28% of secondaries are split by socio-economic background. It says there were “significant falls” in the percentage of white British children attending local schools between 2011 and 2016 in some areas, with primaries becoming more ethnically segregated in the past five years in more than half of the 150 areas analysed.

Full story: Guardian